Home Think You’ve Got 5G Security Issues Protected? Think Again.

Think You’ve Got 5G Security Issues Protected? Think Again.

Home Think You’ve Got 5G Security Issues Protected? Think Again.

Think You’ve Got 5G Security Issues Protected? Think Again.

by Ron Parker
Ron Parker

As interest in 5G continues to heat up, you’re likely to hear a lot more about 5G security. You may not, however, be hearing the whole story. Most conversations around 5G security centers on the standards put forward by 3GPP last year. Those standards are a good starting point, don’t get me wrong, but they’re not the last word on 5G security issues by a longshot. Why? Because they completely leave container security out of the conversation.

5G Security and Containers

There are a lot of new network elements to consider in a 5G architecture, but the biggest change in 5G is the fact that almost everything is now running on containerized software. In terms of 5g security threats, containers are prime targets for cybercriminals because they contain sensitive data such as passwords and private keys. Understanding how to protect containers from security threats is just as important as protecting the transport layers and gateways in a 5G network. Building on what 3GPP has proposed, we believe that 5G security protection has four main objectives, only two of which are currently addressed by the 3GPP’s recommendations.

A Four-point Approach to 5G Security

Let’s start with what 3GPP has already proposed for 5g security standards:

1. A trust model with two distinct, onion-layered approaches for roaming and non-roaming networks. In the non-roaming network, this model features an Access Management Function (AMF) and Unified Data Management (UDM) in the core, wrapped by the Authentication Server Function (AUSF). For roaming networks, 3GPP introduces the Security Protection Proxy (SEPP) for secure connectivity between the home and roaming networks, and the Network Exposure Function (NEF) to protect core services from inappropriate enterprise requests.

2. Encryption and authentication via Transport Layer Security (TLS), certificate management and OAuth2.

But what about security for the 5G services themselves? As the network shifts from hardware to software, telco operators need to have software security provisions in place to protect their data and their customers. At Affirmed, we see this as involving two distinct but complementary initiatives:

3. Secure software development. App developers need to ensure they’re writing secure code, validating it securely (i.e., using static code analysis), drawing from secure repositories and building everything on a secure base layer foundation (e.g., Fedora).

4. Secure containers. Containers represent attractive attack vectors for cybercriminals. 5G operators need to protect these containers by securing the orchestration engine (Kubernetes) with proper role-based access controls, guarding containers in use (through runtime container security) and managing access permissions between the containers via automated policy-driven networking and service mesh controls.

The need for container security isn’t unique to telcos, and that’s actually a good thing because they can now leverage existing security tools that have already been developed for other cloud-native applications. Unfortunately, a lot of telco vendors aren’t familiar with open-source tools like Aqua (for container security) and Falco (for orchestration engine security). Instead, these vendors leave software out of the security discussion, and that leaves telco operators with some big security holes to fill.

The Bottom Line on 5G Security

If telco operators expect to dominate the 5G landscape, they’ll need to stand on the shoulders of some pretty big cloud companies, particularly where containerization and security are concerned. 3GPP’s security recommendations are a good introduction to 5G security needs, but software security is half of the 5G story. If your vendor is telling you only about that part of the story, talk to Affirmed.

 

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